Tadpole's Outdoor Blog

January 12, 2016

Texas Game Warden Field Notes – January 6, 2016

The following items are compiled from recent Texas Parks and Wildlife Department law enforcement reports.

Into the Night
As two Val Verde County game wardens conducted their nightly patrol, they came upon a vehicle that failed to stay in its lane. While the game wardens tried to read the vehicle’s license plate, the vehicle quickly accelerated and almost lost control of the car on a curve. The wardens activated their emergency lights to stop the vehicle, but it only went faster. After following the vehicle for a short time, the wardens saw the vehicle stop and the driver disappear into the darkness. The wardens pulled up beside the vehicle and secured the scene. However, when back up arrived, they were unable to find the driver. The wardens impounded the vehicle and the case is pending further investigation.

It’s Your Own Fault
As a Hudspeth County game warden patrolled an area of the Rio Grande River, he encountered some waterfowl hunters. After talking with the hunters for a few minutes, the warden discovered that one of the individuals did not have a valid hunting license. The hunter admitted to taking several birds. When the warden asked him why he didn’t have a license, the hunter tried to blame an El Paso sporting goods store for not issuing him a proper license. When the warden questioned the other hunters, he found they all had the correct licenses, state stamps and federal duck stamps, all of which were issued by the same El Paso sporting goods store. The warden found an illegally taken coot and three cormorants in the unlicensed hunter’s possession. The warden issued citations for the violations and civil restitution is pending.

A Little Too Late
A Henderson County game warden received a call from a pump technician who was checking well sites about a man dragging a deer off private property to a nearby wooded area. When the hunter noticed the pump technician, he ran to a nearby house and jumped into a truck and sped off. The warden arrived at the house and talked to a woman who lived there. She said her husband just left for town to buy tractor parts. When the man returned to his house a few minutes later, he denied hunting or being on the private property. However, he then said he shot a buck on his property, but the buck jumped the fence to the private property, so he simply went to retrieve it. After the warden questioned him some more, the man confessed to shooting the deer on the private property. He said he got scared when he saw the pump technician, so he left the scene quickly to buy a hunting license in case a game warden showed up. Cases and civil restitution are pending.

That’s a Lot of Illegally Taken Deer
When two Matagorda County game wardens entered a deer hunting camp to check for deer hunting compliance, they noticed a deer hanging from the bucket of a tractor. The three individuals in the camp, all from out of state, admitted to taking several deer, even though none of them had hunting licenses. Further inspection of the camp revealed eight more quartered whitetail deer in three coolers and six buck heads that all measured less than the required 13-inch minimum inside spread. The hunters said they had already thrown three doe heads in the nearby woods, though the wardens only recovered one. The wardens charged the hunters with hunting without a valid non-resident hunting license, taking illegal whitetail buck (six counts) and possession of whitetail deer with proof of sex removed (two counts). The wardens transported all three hunters to meet with the local Justice of the Peace, who received a guilty plea from each hunter. The hunters were fined about $6,000 and owe an additional $8,000 in civil restitution. The wardens donated the seized deer to local charities.

Crossbow Hunters
A Fort Bend County game warden was patrolling a neighborhood still under development when he saw two trucks using their headlights to spotlight deer off the road. The warden let the trucks get close to his location, where a few deer were feeding next to him, and saw one occupant shoot at a deer with a crossbow. The warden then pulled both vehicles over and found two occupants in one truck, both with crossbows, and one occupant in the other truck, with his own crossbow. During the warden’s investigation, he found the suspects had tree stands and deer feeders in place along the road, all without the landowner’s consent. The warden filed six charged on the three suspects. No deer were harmed.

The Case of the Poisoned Birds
A Brazoria County game warden assisted a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services special agent with a bird poisoning investigation. They found that a local farmer had placed poisoned rice in a field. Several cowbirds and a few hawks were found dead in the area. Federal charges of violating the Migratory Bird Treaty Act are pending.

Running Toward the Law
After patrolling opening day of mule deer season for several hours, a Dawson County game warden was heading home through Lubbock County when he saw a vehicle driving in the wrong traffic lane. The vehicle was traveling head on in the direction of the warden, who swerved to avoid a head on collision with the vehicle. The warden stopped the vehicle and conducted field sobriety tests, which the driver failed. The warden learned the driver had 31 previous arrests and arrested him for driving while intoxicated.

Wouldn’t Pass Muster
While patrolling Llano County during the general season opening day, a game warden entered a camp with six out-of-state hunters who had 13 whitetail deer, three Rio Grande turkeys and four feral hogs in their possession. After inspecting the animals, tags and hunting licenses, the warden found that one of the hunters was hunting with a free Texas Resident Active Duty Military license. The warden, who is a veteran himself, noticed the individual’s military grooming standards were not up to par with what is usually required of active duty service members. After asking the individual to produce his state and military identification cards, the warden found the individual was actually a citizen of another state and was not active duty military. The warden seized two whitetail bucks and one doe from the individual and filed multiple citations against him. Civil restitution is pending.

Follow the Vultures
When two Willacy County game wardens spotted several turkey vultures in a ranch off a county road, they went to the scene and found a dump site of freshly killed feral hogs and javelinas. The wardens followed the tracks to a hunters’ campsite and found a list of hunters who had hunted that morning. The warden contacted the lease master and found the individual responsible for the dump site. The warden filed waste of game charges against the hunter and civil restitution is pending.

December 27, 2015

Texas Game Warden Field Notes -December 2015

Filed under: Fishing & Hunting — Freddie Keel @ 10:00 am
Tags: , ,

Game Warden Field Notes

The following items are compiled from recent Texas Parks and Wildlife Department law enforcement reports.

Working on Our Way Home
As two Bowie County game wardens were on their way home just after midnight, they saw a man staggering down the street. The wardens watched the man walk up to a church door and try to open it, then sit down on the church’s front steps and begin to smoke what smelled like marijuana. When the man noticed the wardens walking toward him, he stood up and tried to throw away a bag of marijuana. He also tried to run, but was too intoxicated and didn’t get far before the wardens took him into custody without incident. They arrested him for public intoxication, possession of marijuana under two ounces and possession of drug paraphernalia.

How Hawkward
As a Van Zandt County game warden and a Fannin County game warden checked bow hunters in Van Zandt County, they got a call for assistance from the Sheriff’s Office. Upon arriving at the scene, the wardens found sheriff’s deputies had detained a man on warrants out of Van Zandt County. They also saw something interesting hidden in the man’s vehicle: a sharp shinned hawk in a bucket covered with blankets. When the wardens questioned the man about the hawk, he admitted to shooting it that morning with a 12 gauge shotgun. The man said he was on his way to dump the bird when he was pulled over. The wardens booked the man into the county jail on his outstanding warrants, with an additional charge of possessing a raptor.

That’s a Lot of Illegal Stuff for One Backpack
As several game wardens worked the Brushy Creek area of Hunt County, they noticed a suspicious vehicle moving slowly through a field. They followed it before initiating a traffic stop. The driver exited and appeared to toss something back into the vehicle. After detaining the driver, the wardens searched the vehicle and found a backpack with a handgun, jewelry, narcotics distribution supplies, drug paraphernalia, counterfeit money and about 10 grams of what appeared to be crystal meth inside. The wardens arrested the driver, and the case is pending.

Widespread Stealer
A Fannin County game warden received information from a landowner about the theft of several ATVs and other equipment from a nearby hunting lodge. The warden found the suspect and obtained a search warrant for his home, where he and other law enforcement officers found over $350,000 in stolen equipment, including trailers, tools, guns, a tractor and a semi-truck. The man living at the house gave investigators a full confession that cleared numerous theft cases from all over Northeast Texas. During this investigation, the warden gathered valuable information that will help him recover additional stolen property.

Friends Who Steal Together Get Arrested Together
A Grayson County game warden received a call from a Lake Texoma Corps of Engineers Ranger about three suspects catching striped bass with a cast net in the Red River below the Denison Dam. The warden responded to the scene while the ranger continued to monitor the fishermen. Upon arriving at the scene, the warden noticed one man with the cast net was catching the fish while the other two men, on the bank with fishing poles, were taking the fish from the net and putting them into a cooler or on a stringer. When the warden contacted the men, he found 39 striped bass in their possession. After inspecting the fish, the warden found that none of them had hook marks in their mouths. The warden arrested the men, who did not have any valid identification, for taking game fish by illegal means and for exceeding the daily bag limit.

Laid to Waste
After a man who found three deer and two raccoons dead on a county road posted a picture of the animals on Facebook, two Lamar County game wardens received several calls about it. The deer had their back straps and tenderloins removed. The wardens were able to locate three men who were involved in the poaching. As the wardens pulled up to their house, the men were cleaning the deer blood and hair out of the bed of their truck. After the wardens interviewed them, the three men confessed to killing the deer while “riding the back roads” the previous night. Class A waste of game cases are pending the District Attorney’s approval.

Drinking and Rolling
As a Bowie County game warden was conducting his daily patrols, he heard county dispatch advise of a one-vehicle rollover accident. The vehicle was on fire and a person was trapped inside. The warden responded to the scene, along with a police officer and a DPS trooper. The police officer used a fire extinguisher to put out flames coming from around the engine compartment while the warden and trooper broke a rear window and unlocked the rear passenger door. They were then able to open the door and get to the driver, who was lying on the roof of the vehicle with her feet up on the dashboard. The driver was confused and didn’t seem to realize her vehicle was on fire. The warden slid into the back of the vehicle and pulled the woman out of the car. The woman suffered minor injuries and refused treatment from EMS. After questioning, she was arrested for driving while intoxicated.

That’s My Gun!
Several archery hunters, who had experienced recent theft issues on their property, heard an ATV approaching their area. They stopped the ATV and requested the driver to dismount with raised hands. As he complied, one of the hunters, who is a retired FBI agent, observed a handgun in the suspect’s waistband. After disarming the suspect, the retired officer realized the weapon he had just retrieved from the suspect was his own, which had been stolen a month earlier. After the hunters called them to the scene, a Freestone County game warden and the Freestone County sheriff’s deputy recovered a stolen ATV, a generator, ATV ramps, a firearm and a number of hunting related items from the nearby woods.

Stole One Too Many Alligators
A landowner agent for the Honeywell plant in Orange contacted an Orange County game warden about a nuisance control permittee taking too many nuisance alligators from their facility. The warden’s investigation found 21 alligators, ranging from a hatchling to nearly nine feet long, taken illegally over two days. The nuisance control permittee pleaded guilty to four counts of taking illegal nuisance alligators. Nearly $5,000 in restitution is pending.

You’ll Want to Watch Out for Those Game Wardens
While a Montgomery County game warden was on his way to a possible deer poaching scene, a white SUV forced him to veer to the right, striking a mailbox with his passenger side mirror, to avoid a collision. After following the vehicle throughout the neighborhood, the warden saw the vehicle drive slowly past areas of the neighborhood where deer congregate. The vehicle pulled into the neighborhood’s swimming pool parking lot, where the warden contacted the driver for his suspicious actions. Immediately upon approaching the driver’s window, the warden smelled marijuana coming from the vehicle. After a consensual search, the warden found a small amount of marijuana inside the vehicle. The driver and his passenger admitted to smoking the marijuana and drinking beers while driving around the neighborhood. The warden arrested the driver for driving while intoxicated after he failed field sobriety tests. The warden arrested both men for possessing marijuana.

“Thump, thump, thump” from the Trunk
Two Comal County game wardens responded to a call for assistance from a Garden Ridge police officer who had stopped a vehicle for running a stop sign. During the traffic stop, the officer saw a .22 caliber rifle, a .40 caliber pistol and spent shell casings inside the vehicle. While interviewing the occupants in the backseat of the car, the officer heard several thumps coming from the trunk. When he opened the trunk, the officer found a white-tailed deer that had been shot but was still alive. The officer then called the warden. The vehicle occupants told the warden they shot the deer at about 11:30 p.m. while it stood in the street near a residential area. The warden arrested two of the suspects for hunting deer at night and charged the vehicle operator for unlawfully carrying a weapon. While booking the suspects at the jail, the warden overheard one of them comment to the other he couldn’t believe they got in so much trouble for killing a deer. The other suspect replied, “Yeah, but it sure woulda been good eatin’.”

His Dogs Would Not Allow It
After observing a vehicle swerve and run off the roadway, a game warden initiated a traffic stop. The warden walked to the driver’s side window, where he was greeted by three barking pit bulls. The warden asked the driver for his consent to search the vehicle, and the driver replied that his dogs would not allow it. The warden asked the driver to get out of the car and had him perform field sobriety tests, which the driver failed. After arresting the driver, the warden called animal control to remove the dogs from the vehicle. Once the vehicle was clear, the warden found marijuana, a marijuana pipe and both full and empty beer cans. The man was charged with driving while intoxicated, possession of marijuana and unlawful carry of a firearm.

September 29, 2015

Texas Game Wardens

Filed under: Fishing & Hunting — Freddie Keel @ 10:42 am
Tags: ,

 

Destroy $6 Million Marijuana Farm on Cooper WMA

Public Hunters Discover Illegal Camp, 6,500 Pot Plants during Opening Weekend of Teal Season

AUSTIN – Public hunters pursuing feral hogs at Cooper Wildlife Management Area in northeast Texas over the weekend stumbled upon a sophisticated marijuana growing encampment having more than 6,500 mature plants with a street value estimated at more than $6 million.

Alerted by the public hunters, Texas game wardens led a multi-agency investigation of the well-established site tucked away in a remote swampy area of the 14,480-acre WMA about 70 miles northeast of Dallas. Wardens found a campsite with tents, farming tools, fertilizer, a generator and water pump irrigation equipment indicating the operation had been ongoing for some time.

“This was not someone playing around and experimenting,” said Texas Game Warden Captain Steve Stapleton. “The camp was at least a mile from any road in some harsh conditions. They picked this spot on purpose and spent day and night out there for some time. There was a lot of trash to clean up.”

An extensive search of the area from the air and on the ground by game wardens, Delta and Hopkins County Sheriff’s Offices, Texas Department of Criminal Justice tracking dogs and Texas Department of Public Safety troopers netted no arrests. Officials destroyed all the marijuana on site and seized the property and equipment.

“The destruction to the habitat and the damage these people did to the environment is probably the worst part,” said Texas Game Warden Chris Fried. “They cut mature hardwood trees, including a pin oak that was at least five foot in diameter, and cleared parts of a levee that will take many years to recover. The chemicals they sprayed, insecticides and pesticides that contaminated the soil and eventually run off into the streams will have lasting impacts.”

Fried said illegal marijuana growing operations are not unheard of in remote areas, both on public and private lands, but it is uncommon to catch the illegal farmers in the act.

“It’s something we keep our ears open to, but this is the first one I’ve seen on Cooper,” he said.

In all probability, the growers would have harvested their crops and left prior to the archery deer season opener in early October.

“They would’ve folded up shop by October 1 ahead of archery deer season opening, but obviously didn’t figure in the opening of teal and feral hog hunting season in mid-September,” Stapleton noted.

Instead, they got an early season wakeup as their efforts to grow marijuana crops valued at $6 million went up in smoke.

March 8, 2015

Texas Game Warden Field Notes -3/3/15

The following items are compiled from recent Texas Parks and Wildlife Department law enforcement reports.

  • Daffy Duck Hunters
    An Upshur County game warden and a Wood County game warden investigated an anonymous tip about two duck hunters shooting a 10-man limit of ducks at an unknown location one morning. The only evidence the tip offered were a possible last name and a photograph of one individual posing with 60 ducks. Later that evening, the wardens identified, located and interviewed the two individuals involved, who both admitted to shooting 60 ducks over a baited pond as well as dumping 55 ring-necked ducks in the woods to waste. The ducks and bait were located and collected for evidence. Multiple cases and restitution are pending.
  • Possum High
    A Smith County game warden was sitting on a night set watching two pastures. After a while, a car drove by, slammed on the brakes, swerved into the bar ditch and turned around quickly. The car sped up for a short distance before swerving into the bar ditch and turning around again. The warden watched the vehicle do this two more times before catching up with it and making a stop. When the warden asked the driver what he was doing, the driver replied he was trying to run over an opossum that was trying to cross the road. The warden could smell a heavy odor of marijuana coming from the driver, who admitted to possessing a small amount. The warden issued citations and the cases are pending.
  • Dude, Where’s My Deer Head?
    Two Jasper County game wardens went to a local deer processing plant and began inspections, during which the owner of the plant became very uncooperative, telling the wardens they had no right to look at his business. The wardens stepped out of the plant to discuss the several class C violations they found at the plant, and upon their return to the plant, they noticed a deer head in question with undersized antlers was missing. The wardens filed felony charges for tampering with evidence and the undersized buck was eventually found.
  • Stolen? No. Wait, Yes.
    As an Atascosa County game warden was on patrol, he came across a parked truck on the side of a county road that was “out of place.” He ran the rear license plate and it did not come back stolen. However, upon further investigation, he learned that was in fact actually stolen and had been for two weeks. In addition, the truck had been used to carry undocumented immigrants from South Texas to a designated drop off point in Atascosa County. The truck was going to be reused for that same purpose until the warden happened upon it during his routine patrol. Those responsible had switched out the back license plate with a similar truck’s license plate.
  • Peyote Nights
    Several Texas game wardens helped investigate a group of trespassers on the East Wildlife Foundation property after receiving a picture of two individuals walking into the ranch from the southern boundary fence. Based on prior intelligence, the wardens believed these trespassers were the same ones that had gotten away from them just two weeks prior. In all, five wardens and two ranch security personnel waited alongside a trail the trespassers had used previously, where they successfully apprehended to Mexican nationals with about 103 pounds of peyote. The wardens charged the trespassers with criminal trespass class B misdemeanor and possession of controlled substance first degree felony. Further investigation could lead to organized criminal activity charges.
  • On a Ram-page
    While investigating a poaching case, two Webb County game wardens visited the local taxidermist hoping to locate a missing deer. While going through the records, the wardens found two ram skulls that raised a concern. Further investigation proved that both rams were taken illegally. Both hunters who shot the rams were cited for hunting without a hunting license and no proof of hunter education.
  • “I Didn’t Think You Would Be Home”
    A Comanche County game warden had come home for lunch and parked his truck in the driveway when a knock came at the front door. His wife answered the door to find a young man asking if she knew where he could hunt hogs. She said she didn’t know and sent him on his way. The warden got to the door just as the man was getting into his white truck to leave. He felt there was something off about the encounter, so he moved his patrol truck behind his house and set up where he could watch the oat field just across the highway. At dusk, he saw a white truck driving slowly on the highway and stop at the edge of the oat field. He then saw the man get out, remove a rifle form the backseat, sneak up to the fence and fire four shots into a herd of deer. Another car was coming down the road and spooked the man, so he ran back to his truck and made a U-turn just as the warden arrived to the scene. The warden proceeded to handcuff, search and read Miranda rights to the man before asking him, “What were you thinking?” The young man said, “I didn’t think you would be home.” The warden then searched the field but did not find a deer or any blood. The man said he had just bought the .243 rifle and had not bothered to sight-in the scope. The man was charged with hunting from a public road and hunting in a closed area. His new rifle was seized.
  • Shell Shock
    While patrolling for duck hunters in Aransas Bay, two Aransas County game wardens came across a sea turtle stranded in the very cold and shallow water. The wardens then transported the stunned sea turtle to deeper water and helped it get going. The sea turtle successfully swam way.
  • The Brady Bust
    A McCulloch County game warden was patrolling a county road when a truck towing another truck on a flatbed trailer approached from the opposite direction. The warden met the approaching vehicle side-by-side in the middle of the road and began a casual conversation with the driver. The driver said that he and his buddy had met up in Brady to sell a truck at the scrapyard, but the scrapyard had not taken the truck due to some missing paperwork, so the guys decided to drive around and visit for a while before parting ways. Having been called out many times before to this specific county road for suspected road hunting violations, the warden asked if there were any guns in the truck. The driver revealed a loaded rifle tucked between the seat and the console. Further questioning and a driver’s license check indicated that the driver had a suspended license and a felony conviction. A deputy was called in for assistance on a vehicle search, which turned up .6 grams of methamphetamines, drug paraphernalia and open containers of alcohol. The driver was arrested for unlawful possession of a firearm, possession of a controlled substance and driving with a suspended license.

January 20, 2015

Game Warden Field Notes – 12-07-2014

The following items are compiled from recent Texas Parks and Wildlife Department law enforcement reports.

  • Missed a Spot
    When a landowner in Red River County heard gunshots near his property, he called his local game warden for help. The warden searched several deer camps and found evidence of blood at an unoccupied camp. There, the warden observed that the hunter had made an effort to rake up the remaining debris and place it in a nearby burn barrel. When the warden located the hunter, he had power-washed his vehicle in an attempt to remove blood evidence. After questioning, the hunter admitted to shooting an 11-point buck with his .30-.30 rifle during archery season. Case pending.
  • If At First You Don’t Succeed…
    A Titus County game warden received a call from a hunter about a trespasser on a nearby ranch. The hunter approached the trespasser and attempted to escort him off of the property, but the trespasser refused and continued across the ranch. The hunter then took video and photos of the male suspect, who was later identified and arrested for Class B criminal trespass and an active felony warrant from the neighboring county.
  • Who Let the Drugs Out?
    Two game wardens from Gregg and Upshur County were conducting surveillance near their county line when they observed an individual stop near their location and collect a whitetail buck from the roadway. The subject became increasingly irritable and uncooperative after contact was made. When consent to search was given, the wardens located multiple containers of methamphetamine, drug paraphernalia, suspected meth lab components and an illegal firearm. The subject was arrested for manufacture or deliver of controlled substance and unlawful carry of firearm. Additional charges and cases pending.
  • Dude, Where’s My Boat?
    A Jefferson County game warden responded to a call about a possible stolen boat and motor recovered from the Neches River. When the boat was towed in and contact was made with the owner, he said he had gotten hung up on a pipe and left his boat. When he returned, he discovered it was missing. The value of the recovery was estimated at $15,000.
  • “I’m Sure Glad to See You”
    As a Real County game warden pulled into a hunting camp to check for hunting violations, he was greeted by a hunter who said, “I’m sure glad to see you.” When the warden asked why, the hunter replied, “Seeing you reminds me that I have to put my tag on my deer.” The deer was already quartered in the ice chest and the cape in a trash bag. The hunter was cited for possession of untagged deer. Case is pending.
  • Oh Deer
    Two Bandera County game wardens and one Uvalde County warden responded to information about a few deer that had been illegally taken. At the residence, the wardens located meat from a freshly killed whitetail deer. During the investigation, it was learned that two 17-year-old males had killed one whitetail deer with a bow from a public road that night and also killed another whitetail deer by running it over with a truck a few nights earlier. The Uvalde County game warden obtained written statements from both suspects, and multiple charges have been filed.
  • Darkness Falls
    While a Hill County warden was patrolling Aquilla Lake for illegal hunting activity, he noticed a boat returning without running lights. As the warden performed a water safety inspection and license check, one of the hunters said he had left his license at his residence. When asked why he wasn’t displaying his running lights, the hunter said the lights had broken while traveling to the lake. The warden found that the vehicle and trailer registrations were expired, so citations were issued for failing to produce a resident hunting license and no running lights on a vessel while underway. A warning was also given for the expired registrations. Cases pending.
  • The Duping Deer Dumper
    A McCulloch County game warden received a call that a deer carcass had been dumped in the middle of a street in downtown Brady. A police officer removed the deer from the street and relayed to dispatch the name on the permit attached to the deer. Before the warden arrived, a bystander reported that someone jumped out of a dark-colored sedan, removed the tag and drove off, leaving the deer at the curb. Using the name that was reported, the warden traced the deer to a local property owner who informed the warden that he had donated the deer. The following morning, the warden went to the suspects’ place of employment. The individual admitted to dumping the deer and then returning later to remove the tag.
  • Scared Fishless
    Two Travis County game wardens were checking a known fishing area that has issues with trespassers. As the wardens approached the fishing tank, a male subject saw their truck, which he later said he thought was the landowner, and took off running into the wooded area. One of the wardens then requested assistance from a third Travis County game warden and K9 partner Ruger to track for the evading trespasser. Also deployed was a fourth Travis County warden who was positioned across the wooded area, which was the subject’s most probable path of escape. K9 Ruger tracked the male subject and assisted with flushing him out of the wooded area, where the game warden was in a position to observe the male cross the river and quickly take him into custody. The male subject told the wardens that he had placed his shirt along the river and hidden his fishing poles. Ruger was deployed for an article search and recovered the items. The subject was filed on for criminal trespass and fishing without a valid fishing license. Cases pending.
  • Baited and Booked
    A Cameron County game warden received notification of an individual offering protected fish and shrimp for sale. He made contact with the seller and arranged to buy some fish. The Cameron County sergeant met with the seller at a public parking lot and negotiated the buy of several spotted seatrout and a few bags of gulf shrimp for $100. Shortly after the sale, the Cameron County game warden along with a warden from Hidalgo County were on scene and apprehended the subject. The following were seized: 29 spotted seatrout, of which 26 were undersized; 20 black drum; 28 gallon-size bags of gulf shrimp; and two gallon-size bags of squid. Multiple charges filed.

December 26, 2014

Game Warden Field Notes

Dec. 17, 2014

Game Warden Field Notes

The following items are compiled from recent Texas Parks and Wildlife Department law enforcement reports.

Missed a Spot
When a landowner in Red River County heard gunshots near his property, he called his local game warden for help. The warden searched several deer camps and found evidence of blood at an unoccupied camp. There, the warden observed that the hunter had made an effort to rake up the remaining debris and place it in a nearby burn barrel. When the warden located the hunter, he had power-washed his vehicle in an attempt to remove blood evidence. After questioning, the hunter admitted to shooting an 11-point buck with his .30-.30 rifle during archery season. Case pending.
If At First You Don’t Succeed…
A Titus County game warden received a call from a hunter about a trespasser on a nearby ranch. The hunter approached the trespasser and attempted to escort him off of the property, but the trespasser refused and continued across the ranch. The hunter then took video and photos of the male suspect, who was later identified and arrested for Class B criminal trespass and an active felony warrant from the neighboring county.
Who Let the Drugs Out?
Two game wardens from Gregg and Upshur County were conducting surveillance near their county line when they observed an individual stop near their location and collect a whitetail buck from the roadway. The subject became increasingly irritable and uncooperative after contact was made. When consent to search was given, the wardens located multiple containers of methamphetamine, drug paraphernalia, suspected meth lab components and an illegal firearm. The subject was arrested for manufacture or deliver of controlled substance and unlawful carry of firearm. Additional charges and cases pending.
Dude, Where’s My Boat?
A Jefferson County game warden responded to a call about a possible stolen boat and motor recovered from the Neches River. When the boat was towed in and contact was made with the owner, he said he had gotten hung up on a pipe and left his boat. When he returned, he discovered it was missing. The value of the recovery was estimated at $15,000.
“I’m Sure Glad to See You”
As a Real County game warden pulled into a hunting camp to check for hunting violations, he was greeted by a hunter who said, “I’m sure glad to see you.” When the warden asked why, the hunter replied, “Seeing you reminds me that I have to put my tag on my deer.” The deer was already quartered in the ice chest and the cape in a trash bag. The hunter was cited for possession of untagged deer. Case is pending.
Oh Deer
Two Bandera County game wardens and one Uvalde County warden responded to information about a few deer that had been illegally taken. At the residence, the wardens located meat from a freshly killed whitetail deer. During the investigation, it was learned that two 17-year-old males had killed one whitetail deer with a bow from a public road that night and also killed another whitetail deer by running it over with a truck a few nights earlier. The Uvalde County game warden obtained written statements from both suspects, and multiple charges have been filed.
Darkness Falls
While a Hill County warden was patrolling Aquilla Lake for illegal hunting activity, he noticed a boat returning without running lights. As the warden performed a water safety inspection and license check, one of the hunters said he had left his license at his residence. When asked why he wasn’t displaying his running lights, the hunter said the lights had broken while traveling to the lake. The warden found that the vehicle and trailer registrations were expired, so citations were issued for failing to produce a resident hunting license and no running lights on a vessel while underway. A warning was also given for the expired registrations. Cases pending.
The Duping Deer Dumper
A McCulloch County game warden received a call that a deer carcass had been dumped in the middle of a street in downtown Brady. A police officer removed the deer from the street and relayed to dispatch the name on the permit attached to the deer. Before the warden arrived, a bystander reported that someone jumped out of a dark-colored sedan, removed the tag and drove off, leaving the deer at the curb. Using the name that was reported, the warden traced the deer to a local property owner who informed the warden that he had donated the deer. The following morning, the warden went to the suspects’ place of employment. The individual admitted to dumping the deer and then returning later to remove the tag.
Scared Fishless
Two Travis County game wardens were checking a known fishing area that has issues with trespassers. As the wardens approached the fishing tank, a male subject saw their truck, which he later said he thought was the landowner, and took off running into the wooded area. One of the wardens then requested assistance from a third Travis County game warden and K9 partner Ruger to track for the evading trespasser. Also deployed was a fourth Travis County warden who was positioned across the wooded area, which was the subject’s most probable path of escape. K9 Ruger tracked the male subject and assisted with flushing him out of the wooded area, where the game warden was in a position to observe the male cross the river and quickly take him into custody. The male subject told the wardens that he had placed his shirt along the river and hidden his fishing poles. Ruger was deployed for an article search and recovered the items. The subject was filed on for criminal trespass and fishing without a valid fishing license. Cases pending.
Baited and Booked
A Cameron County game warden received notification of an individual offering protected fish and shrimp for sale. He made contact with the seller and arranged to buy some fish. The Cameron County sergeant met with the seller at a public parking lot and negotiated the buy of several spotted seatrout and a few bags of gulf shrimp for $100. Shortly after the sale, the Cameron County game warden along with a warden from Hidalgo County were on scene and apprehended the subject. The following were seized: 29 spotted seatrout, of which 26 were undersized; 20 black drum; 28 gallon-size bags of gulf shrimp; and two gallon-size bags of squid. Multiple charges filed.

December 11, 2011

Game Warden Field Notes

Filed under: Fishing & Hunting — Freddie Keel @ 6:52 am
Tags: ,

Nov. 17, 2011

Game Warden Field Notes

The following items are compiled from recent Texas Parks and Wildlife Department law enforcement reports.

  • Wife bags her first buck…Not! Terrell County Game Wardens Saul Aguilar and Kenneth Stannard entered a hunting camp on Oct. 5 and noticed a tagging violation on a hanging 10-point white-tailed buck. As the wardens talked with the couple staying at the camp, they noted the man’s wife was particularly excited about her first buck. She even offered her license and ID without being asked. After educating the couple on proper tagging requirements, Warden Aguilar decided to take some time to talk with their 9-year-old boy, who seemed intrigued by the wardens. After discussing his favorite superheroes and passion for the outdoors, the boy said he sure wanted to shoot a buck like the one his dad had shot and pointed to the hanging buck. Citations were issued to the couple after the husband admitted to shooting the deer and using his wife’s license to tag it.
  • High velocity camp prank not so funny after all: Val Verde County Game Wardens Kirk Clendening and Mike Durand responded to a call of shots fired at a hunting vehicle on Oct. 5. When the wardens arrived at the hunting camp, they found a large group of extremely intoxicated hunters. Apparently a hunter who had left the scene before the wardens arrived thought it would be entertaining to shoot at a truck occupied by several people. The wardens took statements and documented the bullet holes from a high-powered rifle that went through the passenger side window and exited the driver side windshield. Luckily, no one was hurt, but the wardens are hoping to file deadly conduct charges against the trigger-happy hunter when he’s identified.
  • Warden nabs felon with sawed-off shotgun: On Nov. 4, while patrolling the desert for hunting violations, El Paso County Game Warden Hallie Dacy came across a man armed with an illegal sawed-off 12-gauge shotgun with pistol grip. When asked why he was in possession of a shotgun like this, he said he was out target shooting. A check determined that the individual had two violent offenses pending, including aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. The warden confiscated the firearm. Felony charges pending.
  • Wardens save two duck hunters: Nov. 5, while returning to the boat ramp after checking duck hunters, Tarrant County Game Warden David Vannoy noticed a large amount of debris in the main body of a lake. As the warden drew closer, he could see the bow of a flat-bottom boat sticking up out of the water. Warden Vannoy rushed to rescue two hunters whose boat sank just five minutes prior to the warden’s arrival. The two hunters and a dog were pulled from the water and safely returned to their vehicle. Both hunters were wearing personal flotation devices when the boat suddenly went down, which probably saved their lives. The two were the last hunters out of the hunting area, and no other boats were around due to the high winds. One hunter said this was his first encounter with a game warden and he was sure happy to see one.
  • No USDA inspection on this meat: Cherokee County Game Warden Eric Collins received a call on Nov. 3 from a local state trooper who said he had stopped a truck and found a large amount of blood in the bed. Warden Collins met the trooper and the driver of the vehicle at the sheriff’s department. During the initial interview, the subject said he had killed a deer a week before with his bow. After further questioning, the man admitted killing the deer at night from a public roadway with a .22-caliber rifle, as well as hunting numerous times without a hunting license. He also admitted to only removing the back straps from the deer, discarding the rest of the meat, and selling the back straps for $15 to one of his friends. Cases pending.
  • Not everyone was out after deer opening weekend: Jasper County Game Warden Justin Eddins and Capt. Tom Jenkins were patrolling the north end of Jasper County when Warden Eddins received a phone call from a local hunting club reporting that two individuals were trying to steal pipe from an oil well location. Warden Eddins and the captain arrived to find two subjects on ATVs trying to steal a 300-pound piece of pipe. Criminal trespass and theft charges pending.
  • Hole in more than one at the golf course: Montgomery County Game Warden Brannon Meinkowsky apprehended two subjects on Nov. 4 after they had shot a doe at night on a local golf course. In addition to the doe they killed, the men were also in possession of an untagged 8-point buck. During the investigation, the subjects also admitted to killing two deer at night and two deer during the day on the golf course last year. Multiple cases pending.
  • Busted by his cell phone: Montgomery County Warden Brannon Meinkowsky was patrolling for illegal night hunting on Nov. 4 when he noticed a truck driving unusually slow through a subdivision known to have a lot of deer. The vehicle was occupied by two males and one female armed with a .17 caliber rifle, a compound bow and three flashlights. During the investigation, the warden found cell phone photos of one of the men holding buck heads. The pictures had all been taken at night and before deer season opened. The subject confessed to killing one of the deer and provided information about the other deer killed out of season. Multiple cases filed. Additional charges pending.
  • “Big” is in the eye of the beholder: Angelina County Game Warden Phillip Wood made contact with a hunter on Nov. 5 and observed blood on a trailer. When he asked whether the subject had killed something, the reply was “a big six point.” After a short investigation, the warden located the deer horns at a residence and found they had already been sawed in half. Turned out the “big” deer taken in an antler-restricted county had only a 9 5/8-inch spread. Citations issued.
  • Funny place for catalog orders: Shelby County Game Warden Mike Hanson received a call Nov. 7 from an informant regarding trespassers on a hunting lease. The caller said two vehicles left the highway, turned off their lights and proceeded down a power company right-of-way. Using night vision equipment, Hanson was able to locate the vehicles. As the warden approached, a male jumped into one of the vehicles. Meanwhile, a female in another vehicle became engrossed in reading a catalog. The male said the female was his sister-in-law and he was just meeting her there to purchase products from the catalog. Just the same, the lease holder elected to file trespass charges.
  • No, really, I didn’t lay a hand on my wife: On Nov. 1 Harris County Game Warden Jennifer Inkster received a call from the Pasadena Police Department about a possible hunting violation. Turns out police had responded to a domestic dispute and found a large amount of blood and a rifle in the suspect’s pick-up. When questioned, the subject quickly admitted he shot a white-tailed deer the previous weekend on his lease, and that the blood had nothing to do with the domestic incident. Warden Inkster arrived and seized an 8-point buck and meat, and citations were issued.
  • Not everyone’s out deer hunting: Zapata County Game Wardens Roy Martinez and Shane Bailey set out on Oct. 25 to check for illegal commercial fishing on Falcon Lake. After several hours on the patrol boat, wardens observed two Mexican commercial fishing vessels enter Texas waters just north of their location. As the wardens made their move to make contact, the subjects bailed out into the brush. Border Patrol marine units came in to assist, and while in route to the wardens’ location, they observed another vessel just south of the wardens’ location. A total of three boats, a motor, and 1,980 feet of gill net were seized.
  • Wild hog leads hunters astray: On the afternoon of Nov. 7, Llano County Game Warden Kevin Webb and San Saba County Game Warden Brad Reeves responded to a 911 call regarding two lost hunters on a 20,000-acre property in San Saba County. The two wardens, with help from the rancher, were successful in locating the two hunters and returning them to their deer camp. The hunters had wounded a feral hog that morning and started tracking it when they became lost. The hunters were several miles from their camp when wardens and rancher located them.
  • Bragging can get you in trouble: On deer season opening day, Williamson County Game Wardens Turk Jones and Joel Campos were patrolling a subdivision in Liberty Hill off U.S. 183 when Campos spotted a man in camo holding a rifle in his front yard. The wardens made contact, and the first thing the hunter said was, “Look at what I shot during archery season.” The hunter then displayed antlers from an 8-pointer. Warden Campos inspected the man’s license and found he had an antlerless tag missing. Warden Campos brought this to the man’s attention, and he said, “Well, you got me; let’s change the story and say my cousin shot that one.” Warden Campos told him he couldn’t do that, and the hunter finally admitted he’d been bragging to people that he shot it. But as a further investigation revealed, in reality he cut the antlers off a road kill he found. Antlers were confiscated and citations were issued.

April 10, 2011

Texas Game Warden Field Notes

March 12, three Mesquite-area youths took a canoe on to Lake Ray Hubbard in 25 to 30 mph winds.

None of the youths were wearing PFDs.

The canoe capsized in the high wind and rough conditions.

Two of youths were able to make the long swim back to shore.

Game wardens recovered the body of the third youth Wednesday morning, March 16.

While on patrol March 12 on Lake LBJ, Llano County Game Warden Rick Snitkin witnessed a boat sink within a mile of his location.

Snitkin quickly responded to the scene and rescued four people from the water.

Two days later, about 2:30 a.m. on March 14, Snitkin received a call regarding an overturned sailboat in Lake Buchanan.

Snitkin, who was home in bed, got up and responded to the scene, safely transporting two cold boaters to safety.

Harris County Game Wardens Kelly Newman and John Rao received a tip from Austin that an individual was advertising on Craig’s List the sale of two diamondback rattlesnakes (male and female).

Officer Rao contacted the individual and set up a meeting in Spring on March 14 to purchase the snakes.

He confiscated the snakes and wrote appropriate citations.

Case pending.

Harris County Game Warden Kevin Malonson received an Operation Game Thief complaint March 9 regarding a grocery store in West Houston offering wild-caught striped bass for retail sale.

While investigating this complaint, Malonson discovered two 34-inch wild-caught striped bass for sale and two cases of farm-raised hybrid striped bass without the required commercially protected finfish shipping invoice.

Further investigation revealed that all aquatic products offered for retail sale in this store had been purchased from an unlicensed out-of-state wholesale fish dealer.

Cases pending.

On March 14, Tarrant County Game Wardens David Vannoy and Patricia O’Neill wrapped up a lengthy investigation on multiple subjects illegally hunting in a city park.

In late December, the wardens received information from Tarrant County Game Warden Chelle Mount that a deer stand and feeder were found on park property by city employees.

To cover their tracks, the subjects had placed a lock, which was fraudulently inscribed with the city’s information, on the city’s gate.

Warden Vannoy made contact with one subject at the property on a late December evening and was able to obtain a confession to hunting pigs and coyotes.

The subject stated that he and his buddy had been hunting there for years, and he led Warden Vannoy to both stand locations.

Wardens Vannoy and O’Neill interviewed the second subject on the following day, and obtained a written confession.

The wardens had a hunch that this subject was holding back, so Warden Vannoy conducted additional investigating.

The hunch paid off as Warden Vannoy was able to find an overwhelming cache of the subjects’ illegal hunting activities posted on an Internet discussion forum.

This provided the wardens with dates, times, and pictures of many of the subjects’ hunts and kills during the course of three years, along with other subjects who were involved. Cases pending.

On patrol in South Texas on March 13, Game Warden Calvin Christian observed a fisherman who was retaining fish caught with a cast net.

When the fisherman began walking back to his vehicle to leave, Calvin quickly made his way around the lake, met the subjects on the road and initiated a stop.

The fisherman said he was catching only tilapia (a non-game fish allowed to be taken with a cast net) and proudly showed Christian nine tilapia that he had placed in a water cooler in the back of his truck.

Upon further investigation, Warden Christian found the subject’s vehicle had expired license plates, a fictitious registration sticker displayed on the window, three black bass hidden under and behind the seats, an open container of beer under the passenger seat, six crappie hidden in a pair of rain boots, and an 18-foot cast net that was used to catch the fish.

Resources and equipment were seized for illegal means and methods.

Several cases pending.

Kerr County Warden Mark Chapa was patrolling near Town Creek in Kerrville on March 6 when he noticed two vehicles entering an undeveloped piece of property.

Chapa contacted fellow Kerr County Warden Kenny Lee so that they could investigate the area together.

The two wardens drove into the area where Chapa had seen the vehicles earlier, followed an obviously well-worn path, and discovered the two vehicles parked off the path in some trees.

As the wardens stopped, Lee spotted an individual in a ravine about 40 yards from the vehicles.

The subject noticed the patrol unit and began to run down the ravine.

The wardens made their way to the ravine, and as they approached they noticed seven other people scattered through the trees in ditches.

The subjects were digging for arrowheads.

Three subjects were together in one ditch on one side of the ravine and four people on the other side of the ravine.

Lee made contact with the subjects on one side as Chapa contacted the others, and questioned the subjects about their permission to be on the property.

All subjects stated that they just assumed that it was OK to be there.

Subjects were all identified and asked to leave.

The area that was being dug covered about a 70×30-yard area and appeared to have been utilized by many people on a regular basis.

None of the subjects had any artifacts; however numerous pieces of flint flakes were on the ground above where they were digging.

Wardens contacted the landowner, who wished to file charges.

Seven cases for antiquities code violations are pending in county court.

The first fisherman Guadalupe County Game Warden Tracy Large checked March 13 turned out to have an outstanding warrant related to a “no fishing license” citation that Large had filed on the subject during an encounter two years ago.

The individual stated that he had changed apartments because the warden had been looking for him.

He was still fishing without a license, and was transported to the Guadalupe County Jail.

One case disposed of and one case pending.

DeWitt County Game Warden Mike Hoffman and Lavaca County Game Warden Kerry Peterson were patrolling the Guadalupe River by boat on March 12 and checked some trotlines to find the line’s hooks baited with channel catfish.

The next day, and after many hours of surveillance, wardens apprehended the culprits when they came to run their lines.

The wardens found a total of 23 game fish, including many undersized channel and blue catfish and undersized black bass used as bait on the lines.

Several cases were filed on the three subjects for using game fish for bait and taking undersized catfish and bass.

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2 Comments »

  1. Idiots…

    Comment by Cindy — April 10, 2011 @ 11:24 am

  2. Wow, seems like they’d just buy chicken when it goes on sale.

    Comment by Kris — April 10, 2011 @ 6:42 am

January 2, 2011

Game Warden Field Notes

Filed under: Fishing & Hunting — Freddie Keel @ 12:36 am
Tags: ,

The following items are compiled from recent Texas Parks and Wildlife Department law enforcement reports.

Hunter up a tree, literally and figuratively

Tarrant County Game Wardens John Padgett and Clint Borchardt found a vehicle parked in the tree line inside a Fort Worth park on Dec. 6. The Fort Worth Marshal’s Office had reported possible illegal hunting in the area several weeks prior. As police vehicles entered the property, the hunter climbed out of a tree and tried to hide. He was found squatting in some brush close to the road and apprehended. A photograph of the subject posing with a deer he had killed was found in his truck. After further questioning, the man said he had shot that deer in Azle, another property he did not have permission to hunt on. The deer, which had not been tagged, was picked up at a local taxidermist. The man, previously convicted of hunting without consent, was also in possession of a drug pipe and methamphetamines. He was charged with hunting without landowner consent, possession of a controlled substance, and cited for the untagged deer for which civil restitution will be sought. Cases pending.

We’re not in Kansas any more

A Texas Department of Public Safety trooper working drug interdiction along IH-35 on Dec. 8 in Wise County made a traffic stop and noticed blood and deer parts in the bed of the truck.  The trooper contacted Wise County Game Warden Chris Dowdy, who then contacted Denton County Game Wardens Chip Daigle and Daron Blackerby to assist the trooper.  The driver at first said he had shot the deer, and then changed his story to blame someone else.  After a lengthy interview the driver said he had brought three bucks back from Kansas intending to process them in Texas and return the meat to Kansas.  He said he had only two tags, but he did not want to waste the meat of the third deer. The wardens went to the man’s house and located a 6-point buck from Montague County along with the man’s Kansas tags, but only one tag was for a buck. The other was for a doe. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service joined the investigation and multiple cases are pending.

How not to hunt deer

Shortly before midnight on Dec. 3, Polk County Game Wardens Ryan Hall and David Johnson observed a vehicle traveling very slowly down a county road, occasionally turning so its headlights illuminated the right of way. The wardens stopped the vehicle and found the driver in possession of a loaded .22 Magnum rifle. He later said he had been hunting white-tailed deer from the roadway. Early the next morning, Hall returned to the area and recovered a yearling white-tailed deer near the scene. The animal had a fresh small caliber bullet hole in its neck.  The suspected night hunter implicated another subject as well, and additional charges were filed on both subjects. These included a Class A misdemeanor waste of game charge for the shooter, who claimed responsibility for not coming back for the deer.  Cases and civil restitution are pending.

Cooler ices case against violator

Polk County Game Warden David Johnson made contact with an individual in a hunting camp on Dec. 4. During a brief conversation, the man said he had just arrived and was unaware of any deer having been killed that weekend.  A check of the camp’s skinning rack proved otherwise, but the individual still claimed he didn’t know of any deer being taken.  But an inspection of his ice chest revealed a freshly-cleaned deer in a trash bag, with no proof of sex or tag.  After a lengthy interview with the subject and his son, the man admitted killing a buck that did not meet Polk County antler restrictions. A deer head was retrieved from the woods and several citations were issued. Cases and civil restitution are pending.

Night hunters see the light

On Dec. 7, Polk County Game Wardens Ryan Hall and David Johnson were called out at 3 a.m. by the sheriff’s department in reference to a night hunting complaint.  Three subjects had just shot a deer from the roadway near a residence and had been followed by the homeowner back to their residence.  Deputies arrived just as the subjects pulled into their driveway and detained them after they tried to flee on foot.  Arriving a short time later, the wardens seized a freshly killed antlerless white-tailed deer.  Both subjects admitted to their part in killing the deer from the roadway and named an accomplice. The two subjects were arrested and placed in Polk County Jail for possession of an illegally taken white-tailed deer and Class A hunting at night.  Warrants are pending for the third subject.

Road hunt goes to pot, so to speak

On Dec. 2 at approximately 9:30 p.m., Uvalde County Game Warden Henry Lutz received a call from a hunter north of Sabinal reporting that someone was shooting from a vehicle on the road near his hunting camp.  Warden Lutz was nearby and located the vehicle, which was occupied by two subjects.  The warden found two freshly killed deer in the bed of their truck as well as a small amount of marijuana. Uvalde County warden Rachel Kellner later arrived and assisted with trying to locate any other downed deer.  Both subjects were arrested and booked into the Uvalde Jail.  One was charged with hunting white-tailed deer at night, a Class A misdemeanor, and possession of marijuana, a Class B misdemeanor. The other subject has been caught for night hunting twice previously in Uvalde County, one of the cases as far back as 1992, and already had a Class A conviction for hunting white-tailed deer at night.  Warden Lutz is preparing a state jail felony case on this individual.

Tipster a bit too tipsy

Wilson County warden Jesse Garcia received a call Dec. 2 that a deer with its head cut off had been found on the side of the road.  The subject who found the deer agreed to meet the warden at the location. Garcia arrived and was inspecting the deer when the man who reported it drove up.  The warden noticed the man appeared very unsteady when he got out of his vehicle and had a strong odor of alcohol on his breath.  The subject said he loved having his beer in the afternoon, and he hoped Garcia was not going to take him in.  After administrating a field sobriety test, Garcia arrested the subject for DWI and transported him to the Wilson County Jail.  Garcia filed a second offense DWI due to a prior conviction, a Class A misdemeanor.

Small caliber equals big trouble for night hunter

Floyd County Game Warden Mark Collins received a landowner call on Nov. 30 advising a mature mule deer buck had been shot and left dead in a remote wheat field near the South Plains community the previous night. The warden responded, gathered evidence, and took photos of the scene. While doing so, he discovered an even larger mule deer buck roughly 500 yards from the first deer. Though mortally wounded, the deer was still alive.  After dispatching the second buck, Collins followed the same evidence-gathering procedure and determined both deer had been shot with a small caliber bullet.  After a brief interview with the landowner, the only known people on the property that night were determined. Having a suspect name but little else, Collins contacted Floydada Police Chief Darrel Gooch, who proved to be of great assistance. After following several leads, a suspect was arrested and taken before a judge, where multiple charges were filed.  Restitution and final payment are pending.

“Fowl” play determined

Floyd County Game Warden Mark Collins and Hockley County warden Jay Oyler encountered a group of successful waterfowl hunters in Floyd County on Dec. 4. They were in possession of numerous freshly killed ducks, geese and sandhill crane, and were busy cleaning the birds.  The problem was, they were filleting the meat from the breasts and discarding the carcass, failing to leave a wing attached for species identification.  The wardens discovered the group had hunted the previous day and had more birds in an ice chest back at their hotel. The cooler was located and found to contain filleted waterfowl breasts.   Multiple cases and warnings filed.

Violator better marksman than he thought

Foard County warden Matt Thompson and Wilbarger County warden Dyke McMahen received a call on Dec. 4 from a Foard County deputy that a man had seen someone shooting from the roadway. The deputy spotted the vehicle the witness had described. The vehicle was stopped, but the two occupants denied shooting from the roadway. After questioning, they finally admitted one of them had shot at a white-tailed buck from the vehicle but missed. Information was gathered, and the two subjects were released. Meanwhile, the deputy went back to the area and discovered a freshly shot white-tailed buck. Arrest warrants were drawn, and the two out-of-state subjects were taken into custody at their hotel for hunting from a vehicle on a public roadway.

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