Tadpole's Outdoor Blog

August 31, 2013

Texas Sets Waterfowl Seasons for 2013-14

Filed under: Fishing & Hunting — Freddie Keel @ 6:06 am

Canvasback bag raised for first time since 1964; possession limits increased

AUSTIN – For the first time in a half century, Texas waterfowlers can take two canvasbacks daily under migratory game bird seasons approved for the 2013-14 by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission.

The increase comes with news of healthy waterfowl populations, with all species except pintail and scaup numbering above the long term goals identified in the North American Waterfowl Management Plan.

“Overall, waterfowl are doing quite well,” Kevin Kraai, Waterfowl Program Leader for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department told commissioners. “We’re near record levels and in some instances in the glory days for ducks.”

The commission also adopted a staggered split between the North and South Zones to allow for the opportunity of an additional week for those waterfowlers who travel between zones.

In another change to the season framework that should be welcomed by hunters, the possession limits for all migratory game birds is now three times the daily limit. For ducks, including teal during the early Sept. 14-29 season, the possession limit is 18.

The only decrease in bag limit configuration involves scaup, with a reduction to three daily. Following are the adopted season dates and limits:

2013-14 Migratory Game Bird Seasons


Ducks

  • High Plains Mallard Management Unit: Youth: Oct. 19 — Oct. 20; Regular: Oct. 26 — Oct. 27 and Nov. 1 — Jan. 26; “Dusky” Duck: Nov. 4 — Jan. 26.
  • South Zone:  Youth: Oct. 26 — Oct. 27; Regular: Nov. 2 — Dec. 1 and Dec. 14 — Jan. 26; “Dusky” Duck: Nov. 7 — Dec. 1 and Dec. 14 — Jan. 26.
  • North Zone: Youth:   Oct. 26 — Oct. 27 ; Regular: Nov. 2 — Dec. 8 and Dec. 21 — Jan. 26; “Dusky” Duck: Nov. 7 — Dec. 8 and Dec. 21 — Jan. 26.

Bag Limit: 6/day in the aggregate to include no more than 3 wood ducks, 3 scaup, 2 hen mallards, 2 redheads, 2 pintail , 2 canvasback, 1 “dusky duck” (mottled, black or Mexican-like) after the first 5 days. Mergansers:  5/day with no more than 2 hooded merganser. Coots:  15/day.


Geese

  • East Zone: Light Geese Nov. 2 — Jan. 26, Canada Geese Nov. 2 — Jan. 26; White-fronted Geese: Nov.  2 — Jan. 12; Light Geese Conservation Order Jan. 27 — Mar. 23.
  • Bag Limit: 3 Canada geese, 2 White-fronted geese, 20 light geese (no possession limit).
  • West Zone: Light Geese Nov. 2 — Feb. 2; Dark Geese Nov. 2 — Feb. 2; Light Geese Conservation Order Feb. 3 — Mar. 23.

Bag Limit: 5 dark geese with no more than one white-fronted goose, 20 light geese (no possession limit).


Sandhill Crane

  • Zone A: Nov. 2– Feb. 2.Bag Limit:  3.
  • Zone B: Nov. 22-Feb. 2. Bag Limit: 3.
  • Zone C: Dec. 21 -Jan. 26. Bag Limit: 2.

Falconry

North and South Duck Zones: Jan. 27 — Feb. 10.

August 30, 2013

Redneck Picnic Table Boat

Filed under: Fishing & Hunting — Freddie Keel @ 6:23 am

 

Redneck-Ponticnic

August 29, 2013

On the Bright Side by Mary Howell

Filed under: Mary Howell — Freddie Keel @ 6:05 am

 

The residents of Hemphill Care Center wish to express our appreciation to Pat Bradberry and her employees for all they do to make life happy for us who are at home at the Care Center.

We say thank you to those who cook our meals, do our laundry, keep our rooms clean, drive the van, and make repairs to our home.

We say thank you to our nurses, the nursing aids and physical therapists too who take care of our health needs.

We also thank our office personnel who file our records and keep everything going correctly.

We give recognition to our employees of the month CNA Amber Gottschald and Activity Director Melissa Williams.

The Resident Council selected Frances Cutright as our Resident of the Month. She faithfully distributes the bibs for us every meal of the day.

Quincy Martindale was named Volunteer of the Month. He often comes to play the piano and sing for us.

Several of our dear friends have passed away since my last Care Center update. We give our love and sympathy to the families of Julia Boothe, Jim Olive, King Davidson, Patsy Hardy, Eva Winn, and Mary Jones.

The churches providing worship services and gospel singing during August were Community Fellowship Church, First Baptist Church, Hemphill Church of Christ, Fairdale Baptist Church, Bethel Chapel Baptist Church, Parkway Baptist Church, Antioch Baptist Church, Harvest Assembly of God Church, and the Church of Jesus Christ of Ladder-day Saints.

August Bingo sponsors include Kelli from East Texas Home Health, Church of Christ, Carletta from Consolidated Healthcare Services, American Legion Post #197, Parkway Baptist Church, and Blair from Texas Home Health.

We say thank you to the Lakes Area Hospice Clowns for their Monday afternoon sing-a-long.

Last Wednesday we enjoyed a concert by the Pineywood Pick’rs. It’s always a pleasure to watch them play their string instruments. We appreciate the cookies and punch they provide for us.

The August birthday party was sponsored by Brandi from Harbor Hospice and honored Ricky Page, Dorothy Butler, Estella Tibbs, Virginia Broussard, Herbert Ezernack, and Lucille Melde.

We enjoyed our visit with the VFW Ladies Auxiliary Post # 10351.

Today we will honor our med-aids with a party.

The staff of Hemphill Care Center certainly abides with the motto “Compassionate About Residents Every Day” to give us a life on the bright side.

August 28, 2013

On the Bright Side by Mary Howell

Filed under: Mary Howell — Freddie Keel @ 6:08 am

On the Bright Side

by Mary Howell

 

                The residents of Hemphill Care Center wish to express our appreciation to Pat Bradberry and her employees for all they do to make life happy for us who are at home at the Care Center.

                We say thank you to those who cook our meals, do our laundry, keep our rooms clean, drive the van, and make repairs to our home.

                We say thank you to our nurses, the nursing aids and physical therapists too who take care of our health needs.

                We also thank our office personnel who file our records and keep everything going correctly.

                We give recognition to our employees of the month CNA Amber Gottschald and Activity Director Melissa Williams.

                The Resident Council selected Frances Cutright as our Resident of the Month. She faithfully distributes the bibs for us every meal of the day.

                Quincy Martindale was named Volunteer of the Month. He often comes to play the piano and sing for us. 

                Several of our dear friends have passed away since my last Care Center update. We give our love and sympathy to the families of Julia Boothe, Jim Olive, King Davidson, Patsy Hardy, Eva Winn, and Mary Jones.

                The churches providing worship services and gospel singing during August were Community Fellowship Church, First Baptist Church, Hemphill Church of Christ, Fairdale Baptist Church, Bethel Chapel Baptist Church, Parkway Baptist Church, Antioch Baptist Church, Harvest Assembly of God Church, and the Church of Jesus Christ of Ladder-day Saints.

                August Bingo sponsors include Kelli from East Texas Home Health, Church of Christ, Carletta from Consolidated Healthcare Services, American Legion Post #197, Parkway Baptist Church, and Blair from Texas Home Health.

                We say thank you to the Lakes Area Hospice Clowns for their Monday afternoon sing-a-long.

                Last Wednesday we enjoyed a concert by the Pineywood Pick’rs. It’s always a pleasure to watch them play their string instruments. We appreciate the cookies and punch they provide for us.

                The August birthday party was sponsored by Brandi from Harbor Hospice and honored Ricky Page, Dorothy Butler, Estella Tibbs, Virginia Broussard, Herbert Ezernack, and Lucille Melde.

                We enjoyed our visit with the VFW Ladies Auxiliary Post # 10351.

                Today we will honor our med-aids with a party.

                The staff of Hemphill Care Center certainly abides with the motto “Compassionate About Residents Every Day” to give us a life on the bright side.

 

August 28, 2013

August 27, 2013

On The Bright Side Mary Howell

Filed under: Mary Howell — Freddie Keel @ 6:00 am

 

This week’s On The Bright Side is dedicated to the loving memory of my dear cousin, Ray Fargason, who passed away on July 11, 2013. 

 

A beautiful memorial service celebrated the life of Ray on July 16, 2013 at Second Baptist Church in Lubbock.  The Lubbock Symphony Orchestra , the Lubbock Chorale and the Shinn/Henry Dixieland Band gave a musical tribute.  The orchestra and chorale were directed by his brother, Eddie Fargason  who is the orchestra director at First Baptist Church, Dallas in a special presentation of When I Survey The Wondrous Cross.  Other musical selections were Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desring and When The Saints Go Marching In.

 

Ray was the son of Claude and Bertinia Howell Fargason.  Ray grew up on a cotton farm in the Halfway community and was a graduate of Plainview High School.

 

He received a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Texas and was awarded his Doctorate of Jurisprudence from the UT School of Law.  He was admitted to practice before the United States Supreme Court.  He was the senior partner in the law firm of Fargason, Booth, St. Clair, Richards and Wilkins, LP.

 

Ray was very involved in numerous organizations such as the American Cancer Society and other cancer related organizations.  He enjoyed serving as a judge for the Miss Lubbock USA pageants.  Although he was a UT graduate, he was an avid fan of the Texas Tech University.  Through Ray’s leadership roles in the music and worship ministries at Second Baptist Church, his deep commitment in the Lubbock Symphony Orchestra and his joyful participation as pianist for the jazz band Ad Hoc, his musical giftedness permeated every facet of his life.

 

Ray is survived by his wife Gail, brother Eddie Fargason, sons Patrick, Ted, Trent, daughter Lisa, and 11 grandchildren. 

 

On a personal note, Ray was a one-of-a-kind guy and a fabulous cousin.  Since our immediate families lived 600 miles apart, the visits to our Howell grandparent’s home in Plainview were special.  We looked forward to spending time with Ray and Eddie and their parents.

 

My sisters remember the happy times with our Howell cousins before our parents moved to East Texas before I was born.  Clara remembers that Ray would have to stop playing games to practice his piano. Ray would have much rather been outside playing cowboys and Indians and would come in with his toy guns in his holster and practice the piano. All his practice paid off because he was a fabulous pianist. 

 

 

 

Ray and I spent happy hours playing our favorite hymns together on the piano and organ although he was an expert pianist, he never made me feel inadequate because I only played with 3-4 fingers.

 

It is hard to put into words, all the things Ray meant to me.  He was cousin, friend, attorney, mentor, musician, comedian and great story teller.  He could make those around him laugh.  Ray laughed and made us feel happy and he had a knack for sharing love and happiness with all those who knew him.  Ray was a humanitarian who was ready to help those in need.   In fact,  the day before he died, he gave away his blood platelets to another patient since he knew his death was imminent.

 

Ray’s courageous battle with Multiple Myeloma over the past 7 years has served as a model of endurance, faith, perseverance, strength and resolute hope for all those who knew him.  Through his humor, love and generous spirit, Ray’s joy in life has been to nurture and enrich the lives of his family, friends and community.

      

Ray lived life to the fullest.  He taught us how to live and how to die.  His faith in God never wavered.  He knew after his death that he would be with his Lord and have a life in Heaven on the brighter side.

August 25, 2013

“THE WRONG SIDE OF THE BED” BY: NEAL MURPHY

Filed under: Neal Murphy — Freddie Keel @ 6:18 am

Have you ever been told by your spouse that “…you must have gotten up on the wrong side of the bed today.”? I think we all know what that expression means, don’t we?

After a vacation or a break from school, it can be tough to get back into your usual daily routine. If you get used to sleeping late, getting up early for work or school might make you feel more tired and irritable than usual. So, if you are grumpy and irritable in the morning people refer to that mood as “getting up on the wrong side of the bed.” This brings up a couple of questions you might not have thought about – does a bed have a wrong or right side, and which side makes one irritable?

Some people argue that on Mondays there is no “right” side of the bed. Where did this saying come from? It is an “idiom”, and the English language is replete with them, most from ancient days. Research does not reveal how the saying “the wrong side of the bed” came about. However, several theories exist.

For example, in the late 19th century, E. Cobham Brewer published Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. He claimed that the saying came about as the result of an old superstition that it was unlucky to get out of bed with your left leg first. This might have arisen from an old superstition that it was bad luck to put on your left shoe first.

It appears that the superstition dates back to ancient Rome where many Romans, including Augustus Caesar, were careful always to get out of bed on the right side. This fit with other superstitions of the time that held that the left side was unlucky.

Others believe that this idiom, like several others that involve the phrase “the wrong side”, merely reflects the fact that there are positive and negative aspects of any situation. Some people believe that when you get up in the morning, you can choose to have a good day or you can let stress and worries get the best of you.

But, is it possible that there’s actually a right and a wrong side of the bed? Some people think that there is. For example, some sleep scientists rely on psychology to conclude that the left side of the bed is right, and the right side of the bed is wrong. They know that the left side of the brain controls logic and rational thought, while the right side of the brain controls emotion and imagination. If you get out of bed on the left side, they believe that you may focus your energy on logic and stay away from volatile emotions.

Experts in Feng Shui – the ancient Chinese practice of placing items in certain positions to be in harmony with their environment – also believe that it is best to get out of bed on the left side. They believe this because Feng Shui associates the left side of the bed with family, health, money, and power.

All express the idea that there are good and bad aspects of any situation. A well-known American example, the wrong side of the tracks, is the only one that seems to be based in a real, physical location.

So, what do you think? Are there a right and a wrong side of the bed? Whatever you believe, one thing is true: even if you get up on the wrong side of the bed, you can try your hardest to turn a frown upside down and make the most of your day.

August 20, 2013

Errors in TPWD Publication

Filed under: Fishing & Hunting — Freddie Keel @ 6:40 am

Errors Noted in Texas Outdoor Annual Hunting and Fishing Regulations Booklet

Mistakes in County Listings for Anderson, Bexar, Cass, Carson and Milam

AUSTIN – Several errors in the 2013-14 Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Outdoor Annual could leave some hunters scratching their heads. The mistakes were uncovered after the booklet, considered the “go-to” summary of hunting and fishing regulations for Texas sportsmen, had already gone to press.

Probably the most glaring miscue that should provide hunters with a chuckle indicates a mule deer season and a pheasant season for Cass County in Northeast Texas. Neither game species have been documented in the wild there, much less in huntable numbers. However, the listing also indicates white-tailed deer and turkey seasons that are incorrect, and omits the squirrel season, which is much more serious.

The correct information can be found on the Outdoor Annual website area at http://tpwd.texas.gov/outdoor-annual where the most updated information is always posted. This site has also been redesigned to improve usability and offer more interactive features. Most notably, the site supports mobile browsing so that the web pages now fit themselves to the size of any screen by automatically shuffling layout, resizing images and adjusting type size. The same content is used for all screen sizes, making it possible for users to read the same information and navigate pages on any device, from smartphone to tablet to desktop computer. The site now offers hunters the ability to search by county and see the regulations for that county or to search by animal and see seasons and regulations for that species. Anglers can also find regulations information more easily on the new site.

The accurate season information for Cass County is:

  • Whitetail Deer—Archery Season: Sept. 28-Nov. 1; General Season: Nov. 2-Jan. 5 (Nov. 2-17, no antlerless permit required except on LAMPS or MLD property; Nov. 18-Jan. 5, antlerless by LAMPS or MLD permit only — countywide); Muzzleloader Season: Jan. 6-19 (general season buck limits apply, antlerless permit required only on MLD property). Bag limit: 4 (2 bucks and 2 antlerless, all seasons combined).
  • Squirrel—Oct. 1-Feb. 2 and May 1-31. Daily bag limit: 10.
  • Turkey—Eastern Spring Season: Apr. 15-May 14. Bag limit: 1 (gobblers only).

Following the discovery of the incorrect information regarding Cass County, a line-by-line review of the County Listings portion of the Outdoor Annual uncovered additional errors, listed below.

Anderson — The dates printed for the squirrel seasons are off by one day for the fall season and do not include the spring season.

  • Squirrel –Oct. 1- Feb. 2 and May 1–31.

Bexar –Contains last year’s dates, which are off by one day.

  • Whitetail Deer/Rio Grande Turkey Archery: Sept. 28 – Nov. 1.
  • Whitetail Deer/Rio Grande Turkey General Season: Nov. 2 – Jan. 5.
  • Whitetail Deer Special Late General Season: Jan. 6 – 19.
  • Spring Rio Grande Turkey Season: Mar. 15 – Apr. 27.

Carson — Contains last year’s dates, which are off by one day except for mule deer and pheasant (six days).

  • Whitetail Deer/Mule Deer/Rio Grande Turkey Archery: Sept. 28 – Nov. 1.
  • Whitetail Deer/Rio Grande Turkey General Season: Nov. 2 – Jan. 5.
  • Whitetail Deer Special Late General Season: Jan. 6–19.
  • Mule Deer General Season: Nov. 23 – Dec. 8.
  • Pheasant: Dec. 7 – Jan. 5.
  • Spring Rio Grande Turkey:  Mar. 29 – May 11.

Milam –Contains last year’s deer seasons, off by one day.

  • Whitetail Deer Archery: Sept. 28 – Nov. 1.
  • Whitetail Deer General Season: Nov. 2 – Jan. 5.

August 18, 2013

THE WATER DIPPER” BY: NEAL MURPHY

Filed under: Neal Murphy — Freddie Keel @ 6:36 am

 

 

They have just about disappeared from the scene, but at one time every household had one or more of them.  In the days before indoor plumbing, homes had water wells located near the back porch of the home.  Drinking water was a bucket of clear, cool, well water freshly drawn by a bucket from the well.

My grandfather, Felix, never had indoor plumbing in his home at the crest of Murphy Hill.  I still recall the back yard well, and the bucket of fresh water on a shelf located on the back porch.  A utensil was needed to drink water from the  bucket, and that utensil was a dipper.  It resembled a small cup with a long handle.  The dipper usually hung on a nail beside the water bucket.

dipper

Everyone in the home drank from that dipper and, strangely, no one ever seemed to get ill from this practice.  My grandfather chewed tobacco, and my grandmother, Mary, occasionally dipped snuff, but that never stopped me from dipping a gulp of fresh water from the bucket.  As I recall, the dipper was never covered or protected from flies or ants.

Dippers were usually made of tin, though earlier versions were hollowed out dried gourds.  The better off folk might afford one made of copper or enameled paint.  But, they were a necessity back in the olden days.  In fact, they were so important then that a story was written about a little girl and her dipper.  It was titled *The Legend of The Dipper:

“There was once a little girl who had a dear mother, and they lived alone in a little house in the woods.  They were always very happy, but one day the mother grew so ill that it seemed as if she could never be strong and well again.  “I must have a drink of clear, cold, water,” she cried as she lay in bed, so weak and suffering from thirst.

It was a dark night, and there was no one near to ask for water, so the little girl took her tin dipper and started out alone to the spring to bring her mother a drink.  She went a long way through the woods, and she ran so that she grew very tired, being such a tiny girl; but she filled her tin dipper at the spring and started home.

Sometimes the water spilled, because it was not easy to carry, and sometimes the little girl stumbled over the stones in the dark road.  All at once she felt a warm touch upon her hand, and she stopped.  It was a little dog that had been following her, for he, too, was nearly dying of thirst, and he had touched her hand with his hot tongue.
The little girl looked at her dipper.  There was only a very little water left in it, but she poured a few drops into her hand and let the thirsty dog lap them.  He seemed as refreshed as if he had been to the river to drink.  And a wonderful thing happened to the tin dipper – although the little girl did not see.  It was changed into a silver dipper, with more water in it than before.

The little girl started on again, hurrying very fast, for she remembered how much her mother needed her, but she had not gone very far when she met a stranger in the road.  He was tall, and wore shining garments, and his eyes looked down with a wonderful smile into the little girl’s face.  He reached out his hand for the dipper, and he begged for a drink of the clear, cold water.

Now, the little girl thought how her mother had told her that she should be always kind to a stranger, so she held the water up to his lips.  And very suddenly, as the stranger drank, the silver dipper was changed to a gold dipper – full to the brim with sparkling water.

The girl hurried on, but the road was so very long, and she was so tired that it seemed as if she could never reach home again.  She was weak and faint, and she longed to drink just a few drops of the water, but, no, her mother would need all that was left.  Had she not given some to the thirsty dog and to the stranger?  So she never took a drink herself, but hastened home and carried it to her dear mother.  And then happened the greatest wonder of all!  As soon as the dear mother drank, she became quite well and strong once more; and the gold dipper, as it touched her lips, was changed to a diamond dipper – all shining and blazing with glittering gems!

And then the diamond dipper left her fingers to shine up in the sky, over the house and the woods.  There it shines every night to tell all little children how, once, a child was brave and unselfish, and kind.”

I don’t recall ever seeing one of grandpa’s dippers ever change into anything other than tin.  But who’s to say that old dippers do not end up with the Big Dipper high in the night sky?  Stranger things have happened.

  • Carolyn S. Bailey for The Children’s Hour

August 17, 2013

Monster Buck That Eluded Hunters Till He Died

Filed under: Fishing & Hunting — Freddie Keel @ 6:01 am

monster_buck

Some of these guys are just so smart

they never show themselves

in day light.

And they died of old age.

++++++

monster_buck1

To have his photo on your game camera

and never see him

could be flustrating.

But it would add a thrill to every hunting trip.

August 16, 2013

Crow Hunting

Filed under: Fishing & Hunting — Freddie Keel @ 5:55 am

Crow Hunting

by: Bob Aronsohn

img I have hunted crows for over 49 years starting at age 11 1/2 years old. Seriously since 1974 when I was 26 years old; I’m now 61 years old as of last February. I had the best season of my life last season. My friend Jerry Byroade (from Maryland) and I shot 3,584 crows on the first 16 hunts of the season last year. This was from late October to mid November. Then my friend, Dick Kilbane (from Ohio), and I shot an additional 6,932 crows from November to February. Our largest shoot last season was 543 crows in one day. We had several over 400 and quite a few in the two and three hundred range. The main reason I love to hunt crows so much is because you just don’t setup just anywhere and expect to have a good shoot. It takes plenty of scouting in order to line up a good shoot. I don’t get good shooting all the time, sometimes I just don’t get in the right spot.

For example, last season Jerry and I were in a known feeding area and shot 179 crows from around 8:00 am to 1:00 pm that day. All morning I could see we were not in the right spot. I saw hundreds and hundreds of crows moving from north to south that were roughly one mile west of our position. When we picked up, I found out who farmed that ground and got permission to hunt it the next morning. Jerry and I shot 425 crows the next day from 8:00 am to 4:30 pm I wanted to share this tip with you, just because you are in the wrong spot does not mean you can’t take advantage of it! I had a very good observation post in which to watch those crows all morning and into the afternoon!

img I want to talk about shot size because most new guys choose a shot size to large for hunting crows. Can you kill them with 4’s and 6’s? Yes you can, but you will have a much higher shot to kill ratio with 7 1/2’s or 8’s because they throw a much denser pattern. This is especially true on long shots because a crow sized target can fly right through a pattern of 4’s or 6’s without ever being hit-and this is if you’re dead on! The reason is because you don’t have enough shot in 4’s and 6’s to plug the holes in your pattern beyond 45 to 50 yards and further. In a 12 gauge load you have 251 6’s in a 1 1/8th ounce load. In a 1 1/4 ounce load you have 279 pieces of shot to hit the mark. Now with a 1 1/8 th ounce load of 7 1/2’s you have 388 pieces of shot as compared to 251 pieces of shot for the same load. In 1 1/8 th ounces of 8’s you have 460 pieces of shot to hit the mark! That extra shot plugs a lot of holes in your pattern down range. A crow is not hard to kill at all, they are thin skinned like a quail or dove. They are also smaller than they appear to be when flying. This is why smaller shot sizes will net you way more crows. Some will argue that the smaller shot will not kill a crow at 50 to 60 yards. I have but one reply for this, go to a trap range and see how a 1 1/8 th ounce load performs on clay targets. Watch the guys shoot at the 26 or 27 yard line because they will be breaking targets at 50 to 60 yards that far back from the trap house! A clay target is a lot smaller than a crow and that is why I favor the smaller shot sizes for crows.

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